Our Smart Project Financing Solutions:

Project Finance:

Defined by the International Project Finance Association (IPFA) as the financing of long-term infrastructure, industrial projects and public services based upon a non-recourse or limited recourse financial structure where project debt and equity used to finance the project are paid back from the cash flow generated by the project.
In other words, project financing is a loan structure that relies primarily on the project's cash flow for repayment, with the project's assets, rights, and interests held as secondary security or collateral.
Project finance is especially attractive to the private sector because they can fund major projects off balance sheet.

-  Structured Finance.
-  Asset Finance.
-  Debt Finance.
-  Trade Finance.
-  EPC Finance.
-  Mezzanine Finance.
-  Joint Venture.
-  Bank Instruments.

Structured Finance:

It is service that generally involves highly complex financial transactions offered by many large financial institutions for companies with very unique financing needs. These financing needs usually don't match conventional financial products such as a loan.
Structured finance has become a major segment in the financial industry since the mid-1980s. Collateralized bond obligations (CBOs), collateralized debt obligations (CDOs), syndicated loans and synthetic financial instruments are examples of structured financial instruments.

Asset Finance:

Using balance sheet assets (such as accounts receivable, short-term investments or inventory) to obtain a loan or borrow money - the borrower provides a security interest in the assets to the lender. This differs from traditional financing methods, such as issuing debt or equity securities, as the company simply pledges some of its assets in exchange for a quick cash loan.
This type of financing is typically used for short-term borrowing or working capital. Companies using asset financing commonly pledge their accounts receivable, but the use of inventory assets is becoming more frequent.

Debt Finance:

It is when a firm raises money for working capital or capital expenditures by selling bonds, bills, or notes to individual and /or institutional investors. In return for lending the money, the individuals or institutions become creditors and receive a promise that the principal and interest on the debt will be repaid.
The other way of raising capital is to issue shares of stock in a public offering. This is called equity financing.

Trade Finance:

It is the financing of international trade. Trade finance includes such activities as lending, issuing letters of credit, factoring, export credit and insurance. Companies involved with trade finance include importers and exporters, banks and financiers, insurers and export credit agencies, as well as other service providers. Trade finance is of vital importance to the global economy, with the World Trade Organization estimating that 80 to 90% of global trade is reliant on this method of financing.

Although international trade has been in existence for centuries, trade finance developed as a means of facilitating it further. The widespread use of trade finance is one of the factors that have contributed to the enormous growth of international trade in recent decades.

In its simplest form, trade form works by reconciling the divergent needs of an exporter and importer. While an exporter would prefer to be paid upfront by the importer for an export shipment, the risk to the importer is that the exporter may simply pocket the payment and refuse shipment. Conversely, if the exporter extends credit to the importer, the latter may refuse to make payment or delay it inordinately. The most common solution to this problem is through a letter of credit, which is opened in the exporter's name by the importer through a bank in his or her home country. The letter of credit essentially guarantees payment to the exporter by the bank issuing the letter of credit upon receipt of documentary proof that the goods have been shipped. Although this is a somewhat cumbersome process, the letter of credit system is one of the most popular trade finance mechanisms.

Mezzanine Finance:

A hybrid of debt and equity financing that is typically used to finance the expansion of existing companies. Mezzanine financing is basically debt capital that gives the lender the rights to convert to an ownership or equity interest in the company if the loan is not paid back in time and in full. It is generally subordinated to debt provided by senior lenders such as banks and venture capital companies.

Since mezzanine financing is usually provided to the borrower very quickly with little due diligence on the part of the lender and little or no collateral on the part of the borrower, this type of financing is aggressively priced with the lender seeking a return in the 20-30% range.

Mezzanine financing is advantageous, because it is treated like equity on a company's balance sheet and may make it easier to obtain standard bank financing. To attract mezzanine financing, a company usually must demonstrate a track record in the industry with an established reputation and product, a history of profitability and a viable expansion plan for the business (e.g. expansions, acquisitions, IPO).

Joint Venture:

It is a business arrangement in which two or more parties agree to pool their resources for the purpose of accomplishing a specific task. This task can be a new project or any other business activity. In a joint venture (JV), each of the participants is responsible for profits, losses and costs associated with it. However, the venture is its own entity, separate and apart from the participants' other business interests.

Although JVs represent a great way to pool capital and expertise and reduce the exposure of risk to all involved, they do present some unique challenges as well. For instance, if party A comes up with an idea that allows the JV to flourish, what cut of the profits does party A get? Does the party simply receive a cut based on the original investment pool or is there recognition of the party's contribution above and beyond the initial stake? For this and other reasons, it is estimated that nearly half of all JVs last less than four years and end in animosity.

Bank Instruments:

We provide BGs and SBLCs from AAA and strong non-AAA Banks. We have provided many BGs that were from strong non-AAA banks that were perfectly suitable for smaller commodity collateral deals such as this. Generally, the rates are approximately 8% for non-AAA and approximately 12-13% for AAA. These prices are inclusive of all costs, fees, commissions.

HELIO GROUP Capital Investment